About White Like Her and how PBS’ Genealogy Roadshow solved my family mystery.

I’m a mystery author with a family mystery I was never able to solve. The mystery revolved around my maternal grandfather, Azemar Frederic. I’d never seen a photograph of him, didn’t know when he was born or died. All I knew about Azemar was that he lived in New Orleans, Louisiana, and was my mother’s father.

When Genealogy Roadshow announced that New Orleans was one of their Season Two cities, I was thrilled. If the show chose my story, I’d finally know the truth of my racial heritage. 

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  • Reviews

“Lukasik takes us inside her family story, revealing that her own mother chose to live as a white woman. Lukasik, bravely and eloquently, writes with a researcher’s eye and a daughter’s heart. In righting her own history, Lukasik graciously affords us the opportunity to right our own.”
Goldie Taylor, editor-at-large of The Daily Beast

White Like Her offers new insights into issues surrounding the complex history of racial passing in the United States . . . This is a book which will elicit much discussion among diverse audiences, adding, as it does, to the too often elusive American tapestry.” —Ronne Hartfield, author of Another Way Home: The Tangled Roots of Race in One Chicago Family

“Important in helping us understand America’s complex racial history . . . Adds to the ongoing conversation about race and racial identity in America because it looks at the ramifications of institutionalized racialism and racial passing through one family’s story.” —Kenyatta D. Berry, host of PBS’s Genealogy Roadshow

“In White Like Her, Lukasik, with the persistence and canniness of the sleuths and the detective novelists she sometimes impersonates, explores how complicated race is in America.”
—Randy Fertel, The Gorilla Man and the Empress of Steak: A New Orleans Family Memoir